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Clearing is a 'buyer's market' for A level students in 2018

"Genie Bateman" (2020-05-31)


Clearing has been called a 'buyer's market' for A-level students getting their results today, with pupils holding offers being urged to consider rethinking their choice.

Clearing is the process that allows students without a university place, https://timebucks.com.vn/ or who want to switch to a different one, to search for and find a degree course with availability.

A survey suggested that on the day before results were due to be released, more than 26,000 courses were available in Clearing for students in England.








Clearing is the annual process that allows British students without a university place, or who want to switch to a different one, to search for and find a degree course with availability


Last year more than one in ten of all university places were filled via Clearing, with the figure expected to rise in 2018.

What once was a last chance saloon for students who didn't get the grades is increasingly about offering students the chance to reassess.  

More than half a million students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are receiving A-level results today.






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However Ucas said the number of people who have applied to UK higher education courses for 2018 has dropped by around 11,000.

The 2 per cent drop brings the total to 590,270 compared to the same point last year.

The admissions organisation said it is due to there being 18,000 fewer 18-year-olds in the UK population along with fewer applications from older UK-based students.






More than one in four A-levels got an A or A* this year - the highest proportion for six years


University leaders suggested that there could be more people who are using Clearing this year to apply to university for the first time.

Ucas has urged prospective students to think carefully about what they want to do and where they want to study, as well as whether they meet the requirements to be accepted on to the course.

Competition among institutions to attract students has also been blamed for soaring numbers of teenagers being given guaranteed degree places, known as 'unconditional offers'.

More than a fifth of teenagers were handed at least one 'unconditional offer' this year, according to Ucas data.